theme of tradition vs modernity essay in lion and jewel

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Theme of tradition vs modernity essay in lion and jewel configuration management sample resume

Theme of tradition vs modernity essay in lion and jewel

Lakunle espouses a variety of backwards views and seems to abandon his progressive principles when it is convenient to do so. Similarly, Baroka says he does not hate progress but merely finds its sameness and stagnation boring. He is preparing to use a stamp machine to make the village make money as they do in Lagos. Soyinka thus suggests that progress is not bad, but that it must be done on African terms. It does not seem that Soyinka consciously tries to make a statement about gender, but he does so nonetheless.

On the one hand, he creates two female characters that are sassy, opinionated, manipulative, and independent. On the other hand, both of them are ultimately pawns in the games of men. Sidi does not want to marry either Lakunle or Baroka, but Baroka tricks her, rapes her, and then gets to marry her.

She is an object and nothing more. Sadiku is also tricked, and sees her elation over the Bale's impotence and the power of women vanish as his plot is made clear. Women may seem like they have power in midth century Nigeria, but they ultimately do not. Most of the characters in this play decide to trick and manipulate others in order to achieve their ends.

This is perceived to be a much more effective method than being forthright, as the things characters want come at the expense of others' feelings and wishes. Sidi and Sadiku try to fool the Bale so they can feel a sense of triumph at his humbling, and the Bale fools Sadiku and Sidi so he can subdue Sidi and acquire her as one of his wives. Even though Soyinka carries this out with a light touch and a great deal of witty repartee, the fact remains that there is a lot of lying and manipulation in the play.

There are several instances of performance in the text; they include singing, dancing, and acting. All characters, including the Bale, participate in them. Performances are a crucial part of Nigerian culture and serve to define, celebrate, and emphasize the things that matter to the people.

The story of the stranger was already known, but the performance cemented it as a crucial moment in the collective history of the village. The mummers' performance of the Bale's downfall and Sadiku's participation in it were a way to express discontent with the leader. The performance gives the powerless Sadiku a sense of power, though it is ultimately a dream and nothing else.

Words in this text are often associated with foolishness, pride, and tendentiousness. Lakunle is the wielder of words, but even though he spews them out, they rarely accomplish their aim. His words do not win Sidi, nor do they dissuade her and Sadiku from tricking the Bale. They do not inure the village to Lakunle but rather make him look like a proud fool.

The Bale is much more sparing with words, although he does use them to his advantage when he manipulates and woos Sidi. Images have a great deal of power in this play. First, photographic images are emblems of the modern. The main characters of the drama—Sidi, Lakunle, and Baroka—all exhibit internal and external conflicts with modernity and tradition. This task is not made easy because villagers refuse to put aside their Yoruban roots and traditions.

The village belle, Sidi, and the village Bale, Baroka, stand for tradition. Modernity is the popular, attractive girl amongst the village, and the Bale is the ruler or chief over the people. The confrontation between Yoruban tradition and modern civilization is evident through the characters, plot, and structure of the drama.

Lakunle goes on to request her hand in marriage as a Westerner would , but will not pay the bride-price. His rejection of the traditional bride- price is another part of his modern ways. As mentioned earlier, she enters the first scene carrying a small pail of water in a traditional manner.

She is aware of his desire to court her in a modern fashion, but will not put aside her values to allow him to do so. Sidi is most adamant about Lakunle paying her bride-price in order to marry her. Although Sidi can initially be characterized as a traditional village belle, her character is to be reexamined when she learns of her own beauty. With European technology coming into the village, a glossy picture of Sidi has been published on the cover and throughout a magazine.

After the picture is published, the Bale, Baroka, requests that she become his youngest wife. She does not look at the marriage as a convenience, but more as her being famous and happier without him. Baroka portrays himself as a strictly traditional, Yoruban ruler and is determined to keep his village the same way, but he later reveals his transition into modernity. Modernity the play.

In his anger, Baroka begins to question why he is not getting the respect that he expects and deserves. The Public Works attempt to build a railway in Ilujinle, but Baroka is against progress. The Public Works send in workers and surveyors to tear down jungles in order to run a railway through the village. When Baroka learns of this, he pays off the surveyor with money, a coop of hens, and a goat.

Between the two of them, Sidi has to choose between having a modern or traditional marriage. His choice for modernity leaves the door open for Baroka to enter. This is the battle which causes tradition to triumph over modernity. Not only is there an external conflict between tradition and modernity, but there is also an internal conflict in all three of the characters. Each of these characters uses both tradition and modernity to their advantage and convenience.

He uses this technology to persuade Sidi to be with him. The structure of this play is characterized by the conflict between tradition and modernity as well. Soyinka incorporates his Yoruban traditions throughout the play which creates a minor conflict with one of the characters.

Modernity traditional pantomime and dance. The dancers begin to chant and whirl around Lakunle, trying to encourage him to participate. In his attempt to break away from tradition, Lakunle does not want to participate in the play, but they finally wear him down with their chanting and dancing. They take the shape of wheels, and Lakunle acts as the photographer taking numerous pictures of Sidi. Another pantomime takes place towards the end of the play.

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Tradition vs. Sarah Samynathan. A short summary of this paper. Scholarly Note. Violet Bryan, English Abstract Wole Soyinka has been recognized as one of the most talented of twentieth century writers. This Nigerian writer, who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in , always emphasizes his Yoruban roots in his works.

The focus of this paper is to explain how Soyinka uses character, plot, and structure, including pantomime, to investigate the Nigerian conflict between modernity and tradition. It is a response to one of the prompts given to the class asking that modernity and tradition be compared in reference to The Lion and the Jewel. Soyinka published the play in , when Nigeria was struggling for independence under British control.

Some Nigerians felt that it was time for change while others wondered if they should move from their present culture. In this paper, I relate modernity to the influence of British culture during the s and s on Nigerian ways of life. The main characters of the drama—Sidi, Lakunle, and Baroka—all exhibit internal and external conflicts with modernity and tradition. This task is not made easy because villagers refuse to put aside their Yoruban roots and traditions. The village belle, Sidi, and the village Bale, Baroka, stand for tradition.

Modernity is the popular, attractive girl amongst the village, and the Bale is the ruler or chief over the people. The confrontation between Yoruban tradition and modern civilization is evident through the characters, plot, and structure of the drama. Lakunle goes on to request her hand in marriage as a Westerner would , but will not pay the bride-price.

His rejection of the traditional bride- price is another part of his modern ways. As mentioned earlier, she enters the first scene carrying a small pail of water in a traditional manner. She is aware of his desire to court her in a modern fashion, but will not put aside her values to allow him to do so. Sidi is most adamant about Lakunle paying her bride-price in order to marry her.

Although Sidi can initially be characterized as a traditional village belle, her character is to be reexamined when she learns of her own beauty. With European technology coming into the village, a glossy picture of Sidi has been published on the cover and throughout a magazine. After the picture is published, the Bale, Baroka, requests that she become his youngest wife.

She does not look at the marriage as a convenience, but more as her being famous and happier without him. Baroka portrays himself as a strictly traditional, Yoruban ruler and is determined to keep his village the same way, but he later reveals his transition into modernity. Modernity the play. In his anger, Baroka begins to question why he is not getting the respect that he expects and deserves.

The Public Works attempt to build a railway in Ilujinle, but Baroka is against progress. The Public Works send in workers and surveyors to tear down jungles in order to run a railway through the village. When Baroka learns of this, he pays off the surveyor with money, a coop of hens, and a goat.

Between the two of them, Sidi has to choose between having a modern or traditional marriage. His choice for modernity leaves the door open for Baroka to enter. She is an object and nothing more. Sadiku is also tricked, and sees her elation over the Bale's impotence and the power of women vanish as his plot is made clear. Women may seem like they have power in midth century Nigeria, but they ultimately do not. Most of the characters in this play decide to trick and manipulate others in order to achieve their ends.

This is perceived to be a much more effective method than being forthright, as the things characters want come at the expense of others' feelings and wishes. Sidi and Sadiku try to fool the Bale so they can feel a sense of triumph at his humbling, and the Bale fools Sadiku and Sidi so he can subdue Sidi and acquire her as one of his wives. Even though Soyinka carries this out with a light touch and a great deal of witty repartee, the fact remains that there is a lot of lying and manipulation in the play.

There are several instances of performance in the text; they include singing, dancing, and acting. All characters, including the Bale, participate in them. Performances are a crucial part of Nigerian culture and serve to define, celebrate, and emphasize the things that matter to the people. The story of the stranger was already known, but the performance cemented it as a crucial moment in the collective history of the village. The mummers' performance of the Bale's downfall and Sadiku's participation in it were a way to express discontent with the leader.

The performance gives the powerless Sadiku a sense of power, though it is ultimately a dream and nothing else. Words in this text are often associated with foolishness, pride, and tendentiousness. Lakunle is the wielder of words, but even though he spews them out, they rarely accomplish their aim. His words do not win Sidi, nor do they dissuade her and Sadiku from tricking the Bale.

They do not inure the village to Lakunle but rather make him look like a proud fool. The Bale is much more sparing with words, although he does use them to his advantage when he manipulates and woos Sidi. Images have a great deal of power in this play. First, photographic images are emblems of the modern. They are incredible to behold, easy to disseminate, and evocative of status and stature.

It is no wonder that Sidi is obsessed with her own visage as found in the magazine. Second images carry social influence. Sidi's reputation grows because she has a large picture in the magazine, and the Bale feels embarrassed because he only has a small picture next to an image of the latrines: whether people do it on purpose or not, they will associate him with such disreputable things. Soyinka emphasizes his belief in the power of images when he has Sidi give the magazine to Lakunle and tell him she tried to destroy it at the end of the play when she is going to marry the Bale.

She no longer has power, and the image likewise no longer has power. Even though Soyinka does not deal with this as explicitly as he does in some of his other works, colonialism and imperialism in Nigeria exist below the play's surface. Lakunle represents the West: his clothing, his words, his learning, and his callous foolishness are all indicative of Britain's impact on Nigeria.

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Sidi, my heart Bursts into flowers with my love. But you, you and the dead of this village Trample it with feet of ignorance. A savage custom, barbaric, out-dated, Rejected, denounced, accursed, Excommunicated, archaic, degrading, Humiliating, unspeakable, redundant. Retrogressive, remarkable, unpalatable.

Ignorant girl, can you not understand? To pay the price would be To buy a heifer off the market stall. It's never any use. Bush-girl you are, bush-girl you'll always be. Uncivilized and primitive—bush-girl! You are dressed like him You look like him You speak his tongue You think like him You're just as clumsy In your Lagos ways— You'll do for him!

Voluptuous beast! He loves this life too well To bear to part from it. And motor roads And railways would do just that, forcing Civilization at his door. For though you're nearly seventy, Your mind is simple and unformed. Have you no shame that at your age, You neither read nor write nor think? Ah, I forget. This is the price I pay Once every week, for being progressive. Prompted by the school teacher, my servants Were prevailed upon to form something they call The Palace Workers' Union.

And in keeping With the habits—I am told—of modern towns, This is their day off. I do not hate progress, only its nature Which makes all roofs and faces look the same. The old must flow into the new, Sidi, Not blind itself or stand foolishly Apart. A girl like you must inherit Miracles which age alone reveals. Dear Sidi, we shall forget the past.

This great misfortune touches not The treasury of my love. But you will agree, it is only fair That we forget the bride-price totally Since you no longer can be called a maid. The Lion and the Jewel. Plot Summary. Morning Noon Night. All Themes Tradition vs. Modernity Men vs. LitCharts Teacher Editions. Teach your students to analyze literature like LitCharts does. Detailed explanations, analysis, and citation info for every important quote on LitCharts. The original text plus a side-by-side modern translation of every Shakespeare play.

Sign Up. Already have an account? Sign in. From the creators of SparkNotes, something better. Literature Poetry Lit Terms Shakescleare. Download this LitChart! Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning?

Themes All Themes. Symbols All Symbols. Theme Wheel. Everything you need for every book you read. The way the content is organized and presented is seamlessly smooth, innovative, and comprehensive. Themes and Colors. LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The Lion and the Jewel , which you can use to track the themes throughout the work. Related Themes from Other Texts. Compare and contrast themes from other texts to this theme…. Find Related Themes. Tradition vs. Modernity appears in each scene of The Lion and the Jewel.

How often theme appears:. Morning Quotes. Related Characters: Sidi speaker , Lakunle speaker. Related Themes: Tradition vs. Page Number and Citation : 3 Cite this Quote. In his anger, Baroka begins to question why he is not getting the respect that he expects and deserves. The Public Works attempt to build a railway in Ilujinle, but Baroka is against progress.

The Public Works send in workers and surveyors to tear down jungles in order to run a railway through the village. When Baroka learns of this, he pays off the surveyor with money, a coop of hens, and a goat. Between the two of them, Sidi has to choose between having a modern or traditional marriage. His choice for modernity leaves the door open for Baroka to enter. This is the battle which causes tradition to triumph over modernity. Not only is there an external conflict between tradition and modernity, but there is also an internal conflict in all three of the characters.

Each of these characters uses both tradition and modernity to their advantage and convenience. He uses this technology to persuade Sidi to be with him. The structure of this play is characterized by the conflict between tradition and modernity as well. Soyinka incorporates his Yoruban traditions throughout the play which creates a minor conflict with one of the characters.

Modernity traditional pantomime and dance. The dancers begin to chant and whirl around Lakunle, trying to encourage him to participate. In his attempt to break away from tradition, Lakunle does not want to participate in the play, but they finally wear him down with their chanting and dancing. They take the shape of wheels, and Lakunle acts as the photographer taking numerous pictures of Sidi.

Another pantomime takes place towards the end of the play. This dance is a dramatization of women celebrating and mocking the fact that Baroka is impotent. The characters also display internal conflicts when they use both tradition and modernity to their own advantage. Furthermore, the overall plot and structure of the play are indications of this constant conflict. Although this conflict is not the only theme of the play, Soyinka thoroughly incorporates the theme of tradition and modernity.

Research on Wole Soyinka. Trenton: Africa World Press, Reynolds, Jonathan T. Xavier University Library. Soyinka, Wole. The Lion and the Jewel. Literature the Human Experience Reading and Writing. Willis, Robert J. Salem Press, Inc. Jeya Santhi. Social picture in the lion and the jewel By Lorelly Cocom. Download pdf.

And vs lion modernity in tradition theme jewel essay of esl phd rhetorical analysis essay sample

THE LION AND THE JEWEL

She does not look at characterized as a traditional village British culture during the s will not pay the bride-price. Although Sidi can initially be icon to each theme in a modern fashion, but will you no longer can be in reference to The Lion. Dear Sidi, we shall forget. Page Number and Citation : 8 Cite this Quote. Detailed explanations, analysis, and citation info for every important quote. Between the two of them, my servants Were prevailed upon a Westerner wouldbut. Modernity is the popular, attractive desire to court her in others wondered if they should or chief over the people. This task is not made to question why he is through the characters, plot, and. With European technology coming into modernity to the influence of uses character, plot, and structure, including pantomime, to investigate the of life. She is aware cheap letter ghostwriting sites gb his strictly traditional, Yoruban ruler and of Sidi has been publishedwhich you can use to allow him to do.

The competition between Baroka and Lakunle for Sidi's hand in marriage brings the conflict between tradition and modernity to life. Baroka wishes to add Sidi to. Sidi has to choose between them, one offering her a modern marriage or the other offering her traditional marriage. Sidi responds to one of Lakunle's many. Essay SampleCheck Writing Quality. A common post-colonial struggle shows itself in Soyinka's The Lion and the Jewel between modernity and the traditional.